DH's classic Biplanes

For three-quarters of a century the name ‘de Havilland’ has been associated with practical light aircraft. Geoffrey de Havilland’s aircraft design career began with Airco during the First World War but it was his creation of the prototype Moth in 1924 that revolutionised not just British club and private flying but established to the world the performance and reliability of the British light aeroplane. When commercial flying began it was de Havilland who built many of the rather basic ‘airliners’ of the age. As aircraft increased in size, DH remained at the forefront of design and development and ensured that the reputation of his company was ever strengthened. Stag Lane, the company’s historic North London factory and aerodrome, was swallowed up in the urban spread of the metropolis and a new base was built at Hatfield. The company never lost sight of its origins and there was a rich succession of ever-improving light aeroplanes for the club and amateur not to mention home and overseas air-force trainers. From the enormous DH.66 triple-engined seven-seater airliner of 1926 DH retained a strong presence in commercial machines with the Dragon spearheading a rich era of multi-engined biplanes that embraced the elegant DH.86 and the ubiquitous DH.89A. Over the years, DH made aircraft for the world, for the rich and for the nobility – like the gold and green-leather finished Dragonfly for a Middle Eastern king. Today DH is but a memory, yet its legacy shall live forever.
All these titles are A5 in size and comprise 32-pages offering on average 60 pictures each, all with extensive descriptive captions.
Orders to: GMS Enterprises, gmsimons@btconnect.com